Sunday, 2 October 2016

Day 83: Persepolis and Shiraz: 53km, 1hour, 25-35°C


A lovely conversation with Nayere and Motlaq to start the day.
We love the friendly curiosity.
Then a short 1km ride to the entry gates for the Persepolis Museum.

So much history in this country.
In the second half of the 6th century BC  Cyrus and Darius (Achaemined empire) created a world empire which stretched from Central Asia, all the way to Ethiopia and from the Indus Valley to Sardi in western Anatolia. This empire included many civilisations - Babylonians, Ionians, Egyptians and Medes. The centre of Cyrus empire was near Persepolis. Darius the great (522-486BC) founded Persepolis as the capital of the Persian Empire. It included a royal residence and was a centre for celebrating the New Year. It was originally called Parsa which gave rise to the term Persians.
In 330BC Alexander the Great invaded Persia and his troops looted the treasury and partly destroyed  Persepolis.

We arrived early, at 8.00am, while it was cool. 
We explored the Monuments and visited the museum. 
The magnitude and design and workmanship of this site are impressive.
As the bus-loads of tourists began to arrive around 10.00am we slipped away and had a refreshing mint, musk and pussy willow drink. 

Then all aboard Orlanda and a short 53km ride  to Shiraz.




 
  
 

      
  

  
Metal bands for holding stones in place.                                        Horse bridles and bits and an axel for a chariot.
 
 
 Detailed stone carvings of people bringing tribute.
  
Travel Brings Wisdom!                                              Pussywillow and mint drink. A Sweet, mellow mint flavoured drink.

 
Orlanda found a little friend while we were away at the monuments.
  
A short distance to Shiraz complete with cars coming up close to take a look at us, a car hauler overtaking  a truck on the hills.

 
To Shiraz hotel on the outskirts of the city. Our home for the night.

 

2 comments:

Margit said...

Good to see Persepolis again. I have fond memories.

Diana Hubbard said...

Yes, there is something profound about the design.